Wednesday, 27 January 2016

Recently Designated: The Carnefac Block at 188 Princess Street

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.     
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.

188 Princess Street ca. 2014. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report.

The Development of the Warehouse District 

When William Avenue became a busy thoroughfare in the early 1880s, Princess Street also became significant in the development of Winnipeg's developing warehouse district. However, this development was not restricted to national firms taking advantage of the railway with large warehouses - newer and smaller businesses claimed space there as well. These smaller business often built small structures that were later expanded as the business grew.

Princess Street looking south from Ross Avenue ca. 1903. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the M. Peterson Collection.

Two-Part Commercial Blocks 

Like the Lauzon Block, the Carnefac Block was designed as a two-part commercial block, a building style that can be traced to Roman times and developed into a popular form of urban structure throughout Europe and North America. These buildings are generally two to three storeys, with the lower level used for retail and the upper floors reserved for residential, office, or storage space.

Design & Construction of 188 Princess Street

The Carnefac Block two years after construction. Notice the large display windows, which have since been replaced. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the M. Peterson Collection.
An integral part of the streetscape of Princess Street, the Carnefac Block is an example of one of these small business structures. Built by William G. Douglas in 1901, the building houses his animal feed business with warehouse space, a showroom, and retail store. The feeding of livestock was still an important business in a city that had yet to see its first automobile and still largely depended on horses for transportation.

Basement support ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
The building is a solid brick structure with wood beams and posts being used for interior supports. Two metal I-beams are listed in the original City of Winnipeg Building Permit as being used at the front of the building, which in turn are supported by metal columns. Oversized wood columns and beams combined with heavy timber flooring throughout the structure provided a much greater level of support than would normally be expected in this kind of building. The total cost of construction in 1901 was $14 000 by contractors D.D. Wood and G.A. Mitchell.

Basement vault ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.

Architect

The architect for this project was John H. G. Russell, who came to Winnipeg in the early 1890s after several years working in the United States. By 1895, he had established a private practice in Winnipeg. In a career spanning several decades, he would come to design many of the city's finest commercial, residential, institutional, and religious structures. Examples of his work include the Lake of the Woods Building (to be included in Doors Open Winnipeg 2016), Augustine Presbyterian Church, Westminster United Church, and the Royal Bank of Canada building. For a complete list, see the Memorable Manitobans section of the MHS website here.

Exterior Appearance

The Carnefac Block in 2014. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
The original front facade of this building was very different for the ground and second floors, as was common for this type of structure. The original ground level had an arched doorway at the south end which likely lead to the second floor offices of owner W.G. Douglas. Four large display windows - two on either side of the main entrance - dominated the front, with a panel of wood cladding beneath each. A corbelled brick band above the display windows divided the first and second floors.

Close up of detailing on the second floor of the front facade ca. 2014. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
The upper level has not been significantly change and was designed with six windows set in plain wooden frames with radiating brick heads and rough-cut stone lug sills. The southernmost bay on the second floor protruded slightly and an ornamental column finished the wall on the north end.

W.G. Douglas 

William Griggs Douglas. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and reproduced from Manitobans as As We See 'Em, 1908 and 1909, published c1909, by the Newspaper Cartoonists' Association of Manitoba, courtesy of the Manitoba Historical Society.
William Griggs Douglas was born in Cambray, Ontario in 1863 and came west in 1881 to Brandon, where he worked as a court clerk. He moved to Winnipeg in 1882, he moved to Winnipeg and became involved in the grain trade by 1888. In partnership with his brothers, Robert A. and Thomas J. Douglas, he formed the Carnefac Stock Feed Company, which would operate out of headquarters at 188 Princess Street until 1920. A grain elevator on Arnaud Street in St. Boniface was also operated by the company.

Douglas was a Winnipeg City Councillor from 1907-1910, during which time he chaired the Police Commission and the Board of Health, and acted as Controller of City Works and Bridges. He retired to California in 1924 and remained there until his death in 1936.

Renovations & Tenants

Undated stencil on the second floor "Carnefac Stock Food: The Great Flesh Producer". Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
Originally, the front half of the ground floor was occupied by Carnefac Stock Food Company, for which the building was named. W. G. Douglas was owner of the company and had offices upstairs. The ground floor featured the retail store, offices, a walk-in vault, washrooms, and a public counter. Much of the ceiling was clad in ornamental tin. The rear of the floor was likely used for storage and the loading and unloading of goods.

Dairy Supplies Limited ca. 1969. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Architectural Survey.
Other tenants of the building included Johns-Manville, which sold asbestos shingles and insulation (1929) as well as Dominion General, jobbers and Northwest Mail Order (1939). Carnefac Stock Food Company owned the building until 1942, when it was sold to the manager of the Fort Rouge Jobbing Company, Samuel Koff. By the late 1940s, it was owned and occupied by Dairy Supplies Limited.


Architect's Plans for the front facade or "Front Elevation" ca. 1961. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg Plan No. 55/1961.
1961 saw a complete redesign of the ground floor facade, with squared aluminum replacing the arched doorway at the south end, and smaller openings replaced the central doorway and display windows. New "face brick" finished the look. In addition the east end of the interior was reorganized into a mix of public space with counters and private offices, all accessed using the southern entrance.

Architect's plans for the front elevation ca. 1980. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg Plan No. 1201/1980.
In 1980, the building was purchased and converted into a social club for the Winnipeg Police Athletic Association, who purchased it from Dairy Supplies Limited. The front facade from the 60s was replaced again and the ground floor windows were built to match the upper floors and the upper storey brick was sandblasted. A rough stone base was also added at this time and the 1961 door at the south end of the main facade was replaced by an arched unit.

Architect's plans for the south elevation ca. 1980. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg Plan No. 1201/1980.
 The corbelled brick band separating the first and second floors was replaced by pre-finished chocolate brown aluminum. The south facade (which faces a back lane off Princess), had two arched entrances added with the central opening accessed by a ramp and the rear unit accessed by stairs. All of the window openings on this side were also bricked in during these renovations.

Architect's rendering of the interior ca. 1980. Image courtesy of City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg Plan No. 1201/1980.
In the interior, the basement was divided into offices, washrooms, and recreation rooms. The ground floor had washrooms and serving facilities at the south end with an open seating area taking up the rest of the space. The upper floor was divided into kitchen/bar space, washrooms, and cloak rooms, along with more open seating. Further interior renovations were completed in 1983.

Original elevator ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.

The Building Today




Ground floor ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
Today, the majority of the 1980s renovations remain intact. The basement features an original brick-encased walk-in vault and the ground floor includes open and office space while the second floor holds the bar/kitchen area. At the time of the City of Winnipeg's Historical Report, the original wood elevator was still in operation and a stencil of the Carnefac Company was found on the north wall of the second floor. It is now used by a congregation as a church and drop-in centre. 

Second floor ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.

Sources & Links

A serving of food for the soul (Winnipeg Free Press April 30, 2012)
City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Long
City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Short
Virtual Heritage Winnipeg - The Carnefac Block

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Wednesday, 20 January 2016

Home of Kay's Delicatessen Recently Designated: The Lauzon Block at 339 William Avenue

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.     
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.

The Lauzon Block at 339 William Avenue. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report.

Quick Facts

  • Likely designed by Johann (John) Schwab, although the architect listed is the owner
  • Was originally built as a butcher shop for the owner, with offices in the upper floors
  • The Knights of Pythias were tenants of the upper floors for a time
  • The building stayed in the Lauzon/Roy family until the 1990s
  • Now the home of Kay's Delicatessen, which has kept the interior's tin ceiling and walls intact 

William Avenue in the Late 1800s 

Looking west from the roof of City at William Avenue in 1887. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba.
When William Avenue became one of Winnipeg's major thoroughfares in the 1880s, warehouses, banks, and businesses rapidly filled both sides of the street. These included the Leland Hotel (1884), the Central Fire Hall (1898) which sat where Old Market Square is now, and the City Market Building, which was a busy commercial and retail hub located west of City Hall, between James and William Avenues.

The west facade of the Market Building ca. 1915. William Avenue is to the right of the photo. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the M. Peterson Collection.
Further west, the street developed into a a residential neighbourhood, with sturdy homes populating both sides of the street. Winnipeg's first public library, the Carnegie Library, opened at 380 William in 1905, followed by the Provincial Normal School at 442 William in 1906. Apartment blocks, schools, and commercial properties continued to fill out the street in the pre-World War I period.

It was to this bustling neighbourhood that butcher Jean Baptiste Lauzon decided to bring his business, completing the construction of a mixed-use structure to house his butcher shop in 1905.

A Bit About Mixed-Use Structures

The Lauzon Block from the east., ca. 2014. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
Mixed-use structures were very common in the 20th century and thus can be found all over Winnipeg, as well as in urban centres around the world. These buildings featured retail and commercial space on the ground floor with space for offices or residential use on the upper floors. Usually only three or four storeys tall, the ground floor is often visually divided from the rest of the building through colour differences and the use of architectural elements, such as a belt course (a line of bricks in a different colour or direction).


The Construction of the Lauzon Block

This business card for Lauzon's butcher shop shows the original entrance to the building, which would later be modified. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the M. Peterson Collection.
The building at 339 William Avenue cost $18 000 to build in 1905, with separate permits issued for the construction of the ground and upper floors. The contractor listed was Joseph Cusson, who was the founder of Cusson Lumber and is commemorated in St. Boniface's Cusson Street. Lauzon also moved an 1880s era frame house that was already on the property to the north end of the lot behind the building, where it remained for many decades and was likely used as a smokehouse. 

1978 photos of the back of the building showing the frame house on the back of the lot. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg.
Towering above the adjacent buildings, the Lauzon Block featured a striking rough-cut limestone facade. A space for signage separated the first and second floor, along with a modest, smooth-cut stone belt course, with ornamental stone elements on either end. The top of the building has a flat roof line with a raised central section and a swan's neck pediment above a carved panel with the words "LAUZONS" and "A.D. 1905".

Detail of the front facade of 339 William. Notice "LAUZONS" and "A.D. 1905" inscribed near the top. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
The ground floor was designed with a large display window and a recessed entrance, decorated with transom windows and ornamental lighting. A second door on the east side of the recessed area opened to the staircase that lead to the upper floors. 

Photo of the east staircase that leads to the upper floors ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
The east, west, and north facades were made of common clay brick, with the ground floor walls covered on either side by the adjacent buildings. The rear (north) side of the building had entrances on both the the ground and second floor along with a fire escape made of both wood and metal that remains to this day. Numerous windows on all four sides of the building provided an abundance of natural light.

Rear of the building ca. 2014. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.

The Building's Architect: Lauzon or Schwab?

The architect listed in the original City of Winnipeg Building Permit is owner, Jean Baptiste Lauzon. However, according to several sources, the building was in fact designed by Johann (John) Schwab, who immigrated from Austria with his family in 1898. By 1902, John Schwab was listed in the classifieds as an architect. 

Schwab was active from 1901-1911 and was responsible for nearly $400 000 worth of work, the majority of which was for small North End houses. Some of his designs included the Henry Avenue Hebrew School, the First German Lutheran Church on Tweed Avenue, and the Polish National Catholic Church on Burrows Avenue, among others. A more complete list can be found here.  


Jean (James) Baptiste Lauzon 

Jean (James) Baptiste Lauzon. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Personality Collection, "Lauzon, J.B. #1.
Jean (also known as James) Baptiste Lauzon was born in Pointe Claire, Montreal on March 15, 1858. At age 16, he became a butcher's apprentice in Point Claire and would later move to Winnipeg in 1876, where he opened his own meat business in St. Boniface within two years. In 1880, Lauzon moved both his family and business to Emerson, MB, but would return to reopen in St. Boniface in 1884.  His business thrived, allowing him to open a branch in the Public Market Building behind City Hall, which would be followed by a move to his newly-constructed building at 339 William. 

Jean Baptiste and wife Adeline ca. 1893. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Personality Collection, Lauzon, J.B. #2.
Active in politics, Lauzon was elected to the St. Boniface town council in 1885, which he served on until 1898. He was elected to the Manitoba Legislature twice as a Conservative member, first representing St. Boniface in 1896 and later La Verendrye in 1907. He was also one of the first members of the Retail Merchants' Association of Manitoba and was a leading proponent for the creation of a public slaughterhouse in Winnipeg. These would later come to fruition as the Public Markets on Marion Street in St. Boniface.

The house at 95 Luxton Avenue. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Nomination Report.
In 1896, Lauzon built a large house at 95 Luxton Avenue, which remains today and has also been nominated for designation. See the City of Winnipeg Nomination Report here
 

Ownership & Occupancy Through the Years

Photos of the ground floor and front facade of the building ca. 1969, prior to renovations to the front entrance. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Architectural Survey.
Lauzon's butcher shop occupied the ground floor of 339 William until the 1920s, when part of the east portion of the space was rented out to the Modern Printing Company, which remained until 1945. A number of smaller businesses occupied the retail space over the decades, including the Canada Cracker Company (1954) and Custom Bedding and Upholstery (1960). The upper floor suites were used as the Knights of Pythias Hall in 1910 but were later converted to residential space. 

The second floor suite ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
After Jean Baptiste Lauzon's death in 1944, the property at 339 William Avenue transferred to his widow, Adeline, along with the rest of his large estate. She maintained ownership until her own death in 1949, shortly after which the couple's daughter Adelina (married name Roy) took ownership along with her son Thomas. The Roy family owned the property until into the 1990s.  

Renovations & the Building Today

City of Winnipeg Building Permits for 339 William Avenue. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report.
Interior alterations were completed on the building in 1983, 1998, and 2007. New concrete beams and walls were poured in the south end of the basement at some point, although the precise date is unknown. Other changes included replacing windows on rear of the building, as well as the replacement of the front windows and doors and the addition of metal cladding to the entrance, which was completed sometime after 1969. 

The refurbished ornamental tin that has been incorporated into the decor of the restaurant ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
Today, the ground floor has been converted into a restaurant, which has kept the ornamental tin ceilings and walls as part of the decor. A small mezzanine located at the rear of the building was used as an ice house, which the present owners have converted into office space. A staircase running up the east side of the building provides access to the upper floor. 

The third floor of 339 William ca. 2015. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and M. Peterson.
Both the second and ground floors feature extremely high ceilings and the residential suite includes an interior hallway and transom windows to increase natural light and air circulation. Most recently used as a performance hall, the top floor is now gutted, although remnants of the original wallpaper still exist.

Sources & Links

City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Long
City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Short
Winnipeg Downtown Places - The Lauzon Block  

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Wednesday, 13 January 2016

The former Bank of Hamilton at 395 Main Street

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.     
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.

A recent photo of the Hamilton Building. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report.

Quick Facts

  • Designed by well-known Chicago-style Winnipeg architect, John D. Atchison
  • Replaced another Bank of Hamilton on the same site that was damaged by the construction of the Bank of Commerce next door
  • 395 Main became the Main Street branch of the Bank of Commerce following the merging of the two Winnipeg branches in the 1920s
  • Threatened with demolition to make space for a parking lot in the 1970s along with the Bank of Commerce

The Bank of Hamilton

The original Main Street Bank of Hamilton Building ca. 1916. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Foote Collection #1345 [N2320].

The Bank of Hamilton was established in Hamilton, Ontario in 1872. The first branch opened in Winnipeg in 1896. In 1897, plans were already underway for a move to a more prominent location. The building and lot on the south-east corner of Main and McDermot was purchased for $30,000 and extensive alterations and an addition were completed before the bank moved in in 1898.

In 1915, it was discovered that the construction of the new Bank of Commerce building next door (389 Main Street) had caused serious settlement problems for the older structure. It was decided that it would be better to demolish and rebuild a new Bank of Hamilton, rather than repair the damage.

Caricature of John D. Atchison ca. 1909. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, N5242.

Architect John D. Atchison was commissioned to design the building, working in association with H.C. Ingalls and F.B. Hoffman Jr.. Atchison was a Chicago-style architect responsible for the designs of nearly 100 Winnipeg buildings. A complete list of his buildings can be found here on the MHS website.

Construction of the new Bank of Hamilton began in July of 1916 but it would not be completed until 1918, due to material shortages caused by World War I. The total cost of construction was $400,000. By comparison, the Bank of Commerce next door cost $750,000 to build. The only "skyscraper" on Banker's Row, the Bank of Hamilton building was designed to hold its beside the magnificent Bank of Commerce next door.

Description of the Building

The new Bank of Hamilton Building ca. 1969. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Architectural Survey.

The building at 395 Main Street was made up of a steel skeleton that rested on concrete foundations; these were sunk 60 feet to the bedrock. The outer walls were brick covered with a simple, elegant limestone facade, while hollow tile was used for the interior. A massive archway over the main entrance displayed a magnificent bronze grill with the Bank of Hamilton emblem in the centre.

The building's foyer was lined in Botticiano marble with a ceiling of antique gold. The banking hall was accented with warm-hued marble, dark woods, bronze screens, and a beamed ceiling accented in gold leaf. The former bank manager's office was on the main floor, and both it and the second-floor boardroom were finished in fine woods. The upper seven stories of the bank were designed as general office space.
The magnificent elliptical staircase in the building, undated photo. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg's Planning Department.
The newly-constructed bank featured some of the latest technological advances in communication. An internal system of communication tubes alongside a full telephone system allowed messages to be conveyed instantly. Time locks and a burglar system on the vaults were the latest in security. The main vault doors were equipped with chronometer time locks and despite their immense weight, were precision-balanced. Heating, lighting, and ventilation systems were also installed with the most up-to-date technology.

Amalgamation with the Bank of Commerce

A view of the main entrance to the building ca. 1969. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Architectural Survey.
Changes in the distribution of wealth after WWI, as well as a recession, changed the roll of the Bank of Hamilton in Winnipeg. In the early 1920s, negotiations began to amalgamate with the Winnipeg branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce. The merger went into effect on December 31, 1923 under the name of the Bank of Commerce. A reduced volume of business, shrinking profits, and insupportable overhead were cited as the reasons for the merger.


For many years, 395 Main functioned as the Main and McDermot branch of the Bank of Commerce, with a basement passageway connecting the two buildings. In 1969, the Bank of Commerce moved to Lombard Place, leaving the 389 Main Street banking hall and the bottom storeys of the former Bank of Hamilton vacant.


The principal tenant of the upper floors of the Bank of Hamilton was the United Grain Growers who rented large amounts of space until 1979. United Grain Growers was the first grain marketing organization of Canadian farmers that was larger than a local co-operative elevator company. In 1979, the UGG moved to their own building at Main and Bannatyne, leaving the Bank of Hamilton vacant. Another tenant, Pitblado, Hoskins, et al, was one of the city's foremost legal firms and occupied the ninth floor from construction until the late 1960s.


Threat & Restoration

Portion of a brochure protesting the demolition of the Bank of Commerce and the Bank of Hamilton.
Along with 389 Main, 395 Main was threatened with demolition when the Bank of Commerce moved out. The ensuing protests and public outcry resulted in the formation of Heritage Winnipeg, as well as successfully saving the buildings from being demolished to create another surface parking lot.

From 1981-1982, architect Robert Gregoire of the Prairie Partnership supervised the restoration of the banking hall of 395 Main. The marble and gold leaf were cleaned, the original spaces were restored and the woodwork returned to its original finish. The upper storey offices were also renovated to meet modern standards.
An undated photo of the fireplace in the second floor boardroom. Image courtesy of the City of Winnipeg Historical Report and the City of Winnipeg Planning Department.
In 1982, the City of Winnipeg's Department of Environmental Planning moved in to occupy the entire structure. The building is now also used by the Recreation Services Division of the Community Services Department.

Sources/Links

City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Long
City of Winnipeg Historical Report - Short
Manitoba Historical Society - Bank of Commerce
Manitoba Historical Society - Bank of Hamilton

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Wednesday, 6 January 2016

A Look Back at 2015

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.    
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.

Happy New Year from Heritage Winnipeg!

We hope you had a wonderful winter holiday and are looking forward to the opportunities the new year holds. Here's what happened at Heritage Winnipeg in 2015 and what you have to look forward to in 2016:

Your Favourite Posts

Here's a look at your top five favourite posts from 2015! 

1. The Fence is Coming Down - Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park

An archival photo of the Upper Fort Garry Gate. Read the original blog post here!
The Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park project continues to move forward. In 2015, the park was granted Provincial status and the fence came down, opening the space for public use. The interpretive smartphone app was also launched, providing historic information for visitors. Watch for the completion of the Heritage Wall in 2016!

2. The First Mosque in Manitoba: The Hazelwood Mosque at 247 Hazelwood Avenue

The front of the mosque. Read the original blog post by clicking here!
The Hazelwood Mosque was the first mosque built in Manitoba, constructed in 1976. We look forward to their participation in Doors Open Winnipeg 2016!

3. Doors Open Winnipeg - 13 Things You Need to Know Before This Weekend

Poster from Doors Open Winnipeg 2015. Read the original blog post by clicking here!
Doors Open 2015 was our most successful year yet with over 27,000 site visits over the two-day event. This was also our first year of holding a raffle during the event, something we hope to bring back in 2016. New sites included the Metropolitan Entertainment Centre, the E.P. Leacock Estate/Marymound School, the Holy Eucharist Ukrainian Catholic Church, Le Cercle Moli√®re, and St. Matthews Anglican Church/West End Commons. 

Doors Open Winnipeg 2016 is May 28 & 29, 2016 - like the Facebook page here for updates. 

4. Signs of the Times: Ghost Signs in Winnipeg's Exchange District

Portage and Main ca. 1921. Read the original blog post by clicking here.
Prevalent from the 1890s to the 1960s, hand-painted advertisements on the sides of buildings are a common site in the Exchange District. Referring to their remnants as "ghost signs", guest writer Matt Cohen gave us the histories and lesser-known examples of the images we see every day.

5. Haunted Winnipeg - Theatres: Guest Post by Author Matthew Komus  

The Masonic Temple on Donald Street. Photo courtesy of Matthew Sinclair. Read the original blog post by clicking here.
Winnipeg tour guide and author Matthew Komus took us through two tales of haunted Winnipeg theatres in this guest post - check out his second article on a haunted Winnipeg hotel here.

What Happened in 2015

  • Thank you to YCW student Laura McKay, SIP student Rushika Khatkar, RRC Creative Communications student Megan Redmond, and volunteer Cheryl Mann for their contributions to Heritage Winnipeg's projects and programs this year. Those interested in working at Heritage Winnipeg in 2016 should contact the office at info@heritagewinnipeg.com.


  • Dalnavert Museum officially reopened after it was closed by the MHS in 2013. Heritage Winnipeg worked in partnership with the Friends of Dalnavert Museum to keep this magnificently restored Victorian home open to the public. Read about it here.  

  • Heritage Winnipeg's Spring Luncheon was held at the Fort Garry Hotel and featured Guest Speaker and Developer Richard Walls, who highlighted the benefits of creative heritage rehabilitation for the community. See event photos here.  

  • Armstrong's Point Heritage Conservation District Study - The study is almost complete. Heritage Winnipeg will review the results in 2016 and subsequently make recommendations for implementation. Read Pat Thomson's guest post about the study here

  • Heritage Winnipeg's fall fundraiser took place at the Millennium Centre (389 Main Street) on Dec. 3, 2015 and celebrated dedicated volunteer, David McDowell. (Blog Post Here). Congratulations to WOW Hospitality, who has taken over as caterer in the building for 2016. 


  • Restoration work on Streetcar 356 continued, and the school program partnership is moving forward. Volunteers are always needed for this ambitious project - learn more here.
  • Heritage Winnipeg is continuing to work hard to get the historic shards out of storage and into the hands of individuals who will incorporate them into new projects, both small and large. More information coming soon! 

  • Executive Director Cindy Tugwell had the pleasure of speaking at the Youth In Philanthropy Fall Conference, as part of Heritage Winnipeg's partnership with the Winnipeg Foundation Student Internship Program.

What to Watch for in 2016  

  • The Provincial Election - Heritage Winnipeg will be working hard to make sure built heritage is on the agenda, with protection and sustainable funding as top priorities.  

  • After many years of advocacy to protect this historic property, Great West Life will be rehabilitating Milner House at 51 Balmoral for office space, with additional adjacent buildings providing much-needed daycare as part of the project. Watch for future developments as the project moves forward. Read about Milner House's history here
  • February 15, 2016 - Heritage Winnipeg's 31st Annual Preservation Awards and the unveiling of the WWI Digital Memorial Project
  • May 28 & 29, 2016 - Doors Open Winnipeg 2016 

  • Dates for our Spring Luncheon and Fall Fundraiser coming soon! 
 

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