Wednesday, 25 February 2015

Changes to the City's Heritage By-Laws: What You Need to Know

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.
With thanks to Rina Ricci, Heritage Planner, City of Winnipeg for her assistance.
 
The Waddell Fountain at 410 Cumberland Avenue was designated in 1988.
**Warning: This one is a bit dry. Sorry, I know, but the information is useful and addresses some of the questions we hear most often! Stick with me, I promise lots of pretty pictures will be included.

The Historical Resources By-Law No. 55-2014

 

The Old

The former Historical Buildings By-law No. 1474/77 was adopted by City Council in 1978 (the same year Heritage Winnipeg was established), and continued to mandate heritage conservation in Winnipeg for over 35 years.

The Transcona Municipal Office was designated in 1980 and now houses the Transcona Historical Museum.

The by-law included approximately 235 buildings on the "Conservation List" and over 130 on the "Inventory List". 
  • Buildings on the Conservation List were graded either a I, II, or II, according to their historical and architectural significance. 
  • Upon application for alterations to a building on the Conservation List, a Certificate of Suitability would be issued. 
However, as with other policies and regulations, by-laws must evolve to keep up with the changing needs of the community.

The Pantages Playhouse Theatre was designated in 1981.

The New

The Historical Resources By-law No. 55/2014 came into effect on June 1, 2014.

Some of the goals of the new by-law include:
  • to broaden the scope to celebrate landscapes and architecturally/historically significant buildings that are at least 40 years old (this would include Modernist buildings such as City Hall);
  • to create new options for recognition - listed as a Historical Resource or Commemorated;
  • to allow more input in recognizing heritage resources via a new nomination system, open to both building owners and the Director of Property Planning & Development
  • to bring more clarity, transparency, and fairness to owners through clear processes, set time frames for decisions, notifications, etc.
  • to bring clarity to designations by replacing the grading system with a listing of Character-Defining Elements (CDEs) of a resource that are protected under the by-law
  • to ensure congruence with The City of Winnipeg Charter and Our Winnipeg
St. Boniface Museum/Le Musee de St-Boniface is a former convent that was designated in 1995.

 Committee Changes

The Historical Buildings Committee (HBC) is now the Historical Buildings & Resources Committee (HBRC). It remains an advisory committee to Council, reporting through the Standing Policy Committee on Downtown Development, Heritage, and Riverbank Management.

The Dalnavert Museum, former home of Sir Hugh John Macdonald, was designated in 1998.

HBRC Membership continues to include:
  • 3 representatives from City Council, one of whom will chair
  • 2 representatives from the Province of Manitoba
  • 2 representatives from the Government of Canada
  • 2 representatives from the Manitoba Association of Architects
New Members include:
  • 1 representative from the Association of Landscape Architects
  • 1 representative from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Manitoba
  • 2 Members-at-Large
For a grand total of 13 committee members.

The Historical Buildings and Resources Committee will continue to hold monthly meetings which the public can observe (may go in camera), consult experts and advocates as required, continue to have technical seminars (closed) to discuss confidential/proprietary applications, have three year term limits and be able to be reappointed (except Members-at-Large, who may serve only one additional term), and have a 60% attendance requirement for regular meetings for non-Council members.

The former North West Travellers' Association Building at 291 Garry Street was designated in 2002.

Definitions

Just to make sure everyone is on the same page, here are some quick definitions to make the information below a little easier:

A historical resource is a building or land, or an element of a building or land (that is likely deemed possibly worthy of protection).

The Conservation List was the list of designated buildings under the old by-law that included a grading system; the owner was informed and the building was legally protected, with a caveat on the title.

The Inventory List was a list of buildings under the old by-law that were protected from demolition but not alteration and the owner's consent was not obtained for their building to be included on this list.

Conservation work being done on Wesley Hall at the University of Winnipeg, designated in 2001.

List of Historical Resources

This list replaces the Conservation List from the old by-law, but operates similarly. Buildings on this list:
  • must be 40 years of age or older
  • are protected from demolition
  • have a caveat registered on the title alerting owners and potential buyers of the building's heritage status
  • require a Heritage Permit for alterations
  • may be eligible for financial assistance from the City or other funding agencies
  • list posted on the City of Winnipeg website here
  • all buildings that were formerly on the Inventory List were deemed nominated to the List of Historical Resources on June 1, 2014, when the new by-law came into effect. There are approximately 130 buildings that are currently nominated for heritage designation
For the more visual among us - what happens to the buildings from the Inventory List under the old by-law.
The grading system has been removed and replaced by a list of Character Defining Elements, that is, key elements of the building that must be protected. Examples might include a building's front facade, marble staircase, or elaborate fireplace. All structures currently listed without CDEs will be assigned them but protection is continuous throughout the process.

Nominated Resources

All buildings that have been nominated to be added to the List of Historical Resources are:
  • protected from demolition but have no restrictions on alterations
  • The HBRC must make a recommendation regarding nomination for heritage listing within 36 months of the resource being nominated
Kelly House, designated as a heritage building in 1982.

Commemorative List

This list is solely intended to celebrate Winnipeg's heritage for the interest of the public.
  • a photo and basic information will be posted on the City's website but no information about the owner is included
  • does not restrict the owner from altering or demolishing the resource
  • not eligible for heritage financial assistance
  • only the Director of Property Planning & Development has the authority to add or remove resources from this list, however, the HBRC may make recommendation that a resource be added
  • resources can remain on the list even if it is demolished

Listing/Designating a New Building  


Click on the photo to see a larger version.

There are two ways that a new building can be designated - the first through Nomination by the Director of Property Planning & Development, who also indicates the elements to be protected; the second is through an Application by the owner of the building in question.

The Owner Application will provide basic information and indicate elements to be protected by the designation (subject to a processing fee). Following the submission of the application, an internal triage will determine if the building will be nominated for the List of Historical Resources. If the building is not nominated to this list, it is still possible for it to be added to the Commemorative List mentioned above.

Regardless of the source of the nomination (Owner or Director), the building is then brought before the HBRC for evaluation and recommendation (Owner option for expedited review for $2500 fee). They can recommend not to list/designate the property or recommend it to the List of Historical Resources, along with the elements that are to be protected.

Interior of the Manitoba Indigenous Cultural Education Centre at 119 Sutherland Avenue, designated in 2004.
The process then continues with the Standing Policy Committee on Downtown Development Heritage and Riverbank Management (SPC DDHRM), who make their own recommendations, and set out in the listing the Character Defining Elements in reference to the recommendations of the HBRC. Delegations such as Heritage Winnipeg, residence associations, or building owners can speak at these meetings and they are open to the public.

If the determination of the SPC DDHRM is identical to the HBRC's recommendation and there is no opposition from the owner, the decision is final. If there is owner opposition or the determination of the SPC DDHRM is inconsistent with that of the HBRC's recommendation, then a final decision regarding listing is made by City Council.

De-listing/Removing (or Modifying) Designation

Click the photo to view a larger version.
A resource may be removed from the List of Historical Resources or a listing may be modified. In order to do so, there are two possibilities. One is through owner application (subject to a processing fee) and the other is through Director application. The Director may apply to remove a resource from the list if it were severely damaged or destroyed, or if the resource posed a health and safety hazard. The Director's decision to apply for de-listing is not subject to appeal.

The HBRC will evalute applications received within 90 days and must make a recommendation to the SPC DDHRM regarding the application to remove or modify the listing.

The former Birks Building at 276 Portage Avenue was designated in 1999.
After considering the HBRC's recommendations, the SPC on DDHRM must determine whether or not the resource's listing should be modified or removed. Again, if their determinations are identical, their decision is final. If there are any inconsistencies, the final decision goes to City Council.

The meetings of the SPC DDHRM are open to the public, and owners or organizations such as Heritage Winnipeg or residence associations, may appear in delegation at these meetings. Building owners may also provide a written submission for consideration.

Heritage Permits

The previous "Certificate of Suitability" is now the "Heritage Permit". As before, the Heritage Planner will refer permit applications to the HBRC for consideration and rely on their advice and/or apply established guidelines when considering a permit application. Decisions are required within 90 days. The heritage permit may only allow alterations that are consistent with conservation of the heritage values embodied by the Character Defining Elements identified in the listing and in compliance with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada.

The Firefighters Museum of Winnipeg, housed in the former Fire Hall No. 3, designated in 1991.

Offences

Contraventions are subject to a fine of no less than $1000 and no more than $1 million for each contravention, or each day for which a contravention is ongoing.

The Director and delegated employees may administer and enforce the by-law, conduct inspections, issue orders prohibiting work, and remedy a contravention in accordance with the Charter.

The New By-Law Does Not Affect

  • the Heritage Management Plan
  • the Conservation Tax Credit Program or the Gail Parvin Hammerquist Fund
  • the Charter Rights (Heritage Districts, Historic Property Notices on the title, etc.)
  • the provisions of the Vacant Buildings By-Law
The Ukrainian Labour Temple at 591 Pritchard, designated in 1997.
 In the three years after the implementation of the by-law, the City and the Historical Buildings and Resources Committee are working towards meeting the targets set out in the Historical Resources By-Law: evaluating the 130 Nominated Buildings from the former Inventory List at a rate of 4 buildings per month, starting with the buildings in the Exchange District, a national historic site.

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Wednesday, 18 February 2015

The 30th Annual Preservation Award Recipients

Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.
With thanks to Tony Eshmade for assistance with photographs

Representatives from the Manitoba Living History Society attended the event in full costume!
Representatives from the Manitoba Living History Society attended the event in full costume!
Heritage Winnipeg's Annual Preservation Awards are held every year on National Heritage Day/Louis Riel Day to celebrate the contributions of individuals, organizations, and companies to the preservation of Winnipeg's built heritage. 

Ladies from the Manitoba Living History Society
Ladies from the Manitoba Living History Society.
This year we were also celebrating National Flag Day, the 50th birthday of our national flag. Thank you to Canadian Heritage for their contributions to this event.

HW President, Jordan van Sewell, speaks at the beginning of the awards ceremony.
HW President, Jordan van Sewell, speaks at the beginning of the awards ceremony.
The number of awards given vary from year to year, but the categories and their requirements can be found detailed in a previous blog post here. As well, photos of the nominated buildings and details about the preservation work that has been undertaken can be found here.

Councillor Shawn Dobson brought greetings from Mayor Bowman and City Council
Councillor Shawn Dobson brought greetings from Mayor Bowman and City Council.
And without further ado, here are the 2015 Preservation Award recipients:

2015 Award Recipients


Commercial Conservation Award to:
VIA Rail Canada
Bridgman Collaborative Architecture Ltd.
Gary Dy, accepting award on behalf of VIA Rail Canada
Gary Dy, accepting award on behalf of VIA Rail Canada
Architects Marcella Poirer and Wins Bridgeman accepting award on behalf of Bridgman Collaborative Architecture Ltd.
Architects Marcella Poirer and Wins Bridgman accepting award on behalf of Bridgman Collaborative Architecture Ltd.
For their work and vision of this historic former Union Station built in 1911 and located at 123 Main Street. For their leadership in the restoration of the historic rotunda, the enhancement of the passenger area, and augmenting the exterior at the back entrance, therefore strengthening the connection of the building from the Forks and Saint Boniface. 

Residential Conservation Award to:
The Bell Building Inc.
Neil Cooper Architects Inc.  

Daniel Melendez, accepting award on behalf of Karl Loepp (The Bell Building Inc.)
Daniel Melendez, accepting award on behalf of Karl Loepp (The Bell Building Inc.).
 For this downtown condominium project in the historic building built in 1905 and located at 370 Donald Street. For their civic leadership on this residential conversion that sympathetically retains the character of the original building while retaining many of the interior character defining elements.

Commercial Conservation Award to:
Riverwood Church Community
John Van Leeuwen Architecture
Award accepted by Executive Pastor Laurence Fernandez.
Award accepted by Executive Pastor Laurence Fernandez.

Architect John Van Leeuwen accepts award from HW Board Member Lisa Gardewine.
Architect John Van Leeuwen accepts an award from HW Board Member Lisa Gardewine.
For the rehabilitation of the Riverwood Church Community, the former Fire Hall Station 8 located at 325 Talbot Avenue. For their pivotal role in taking great care in rehabilitating this historic building so that it continues to be a landmark in the community as well as a vibrant part of the Elmwood community.

Residential Conservation Award to:
Veritas Development Corporation
Northern Sky Architecture Inc. 

Award accepted by Architect Donald Oliver, on behalf of both Veritas Development Corporation and Northern Sky Architecture Inc.
Award accepted by Architect Donald Oliver, on behalf of both Veritas Development Corporation and Northern Sky Architecture Inc.
For this downtown condominium project in the historic warehouse building built in 1912 located at 128 James Avenue. For their civic and design leadership on this residential conversion that sympathetically retains the character of the original building.

Residential Conservation Award to:
Streetside Development Corporation
701 Architecture Inc.

Jon Faderon, accepting award on behalf of Streetside Development Corporation
Jon Faderon, accepting award on behalf of Streetside Development Corporation.

Award accepted by 701 Architecture Inc.
Award accepted by 701 Architecture Inc.
 For this downtown condominium project in the historic warehouse buildings built in 1910/11, and located presently at 132 James Avenue. For their civic leadership on this residential conversion that sympathetically retains the character of the original heritage buildings at 130 & 132/134 James Avenue.

For the Revitalization of North Main:
Neechi Commons
Award accepted by Russ Rothney
Award accepted by Russ Rothney.
The owners of of the building located at 859 Main Street, for their leadership in a valuable employment, cultural, and community-building role through their large-scale investment in the North Main area working with existing buildings and the Aboriginal Community. Their work has played a pivotal role in the community by promoting this Aboriginal-based food, art, and social activist centre.

Distinguished Service Award to:
Marie Zorniak
Marie Zorniak accepts her award
Marie Zorniak accepts her award.
 as a driving force and long-time chair of the Provincial Red River Heritage Fair. The Heritage Fiar activities have been part of Winnipeg's educational offerings since Historica sponsored the first event in 1993. She has volunteered her time and expertise for over twenty years, and has ben an integral part of facilitating this event and its long-time success.

Distinguished Service Award to:
St. Matthew's Anglican Parish 
Grain of Wheat Community Church 
Bob Clarkson and Roger Gateson accept awards on behalf of the church communities
Bob Clarkson and Roger Gateson accept awards on behalf of the church communities.
 for the adaptive re-use of the historic St. Matthew's Anglican Church built in 1913 and located at the northwest corner of Maryland and St. Matthew's. The converted building that makes up WestEnd Commons contains three components - residential, religious service space, and a neighbourhood resource centre for the community.

 

Acknowledgements

This event would not have been possible without the generous support of the following:

Manitoba Living History Society
Greg Agnew
Wins Bridgman
Nancy Klos
David & Linda McDowell
389 Main Street Heritage Corporation
 Walt Schoenhausen
 Dayna Kinsman
 Hilda Wagstaffe
 Herbert Stewart


Thank you to the members of our 2015 Judging Committee:

Neil Einarson, Province of Manitoba
 Les Stechesen, Architect
 Jim Kacki, Architect
 Kyle Ledhowski, Province of Manitoba
 Murray Peterson, City of Winnipeg

Next Year...

As this is an annual event, the Preservation Awards will return next year on Monday, February 15, 2016.

Nomination forms will become available a few months prior to the awards, so keep your eyes peeled for deserving projects!

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Wednesday, 11 February 2015

Annual Preservation Awards 2015 Nominations


Article by Laura McKay, on behalf of Heritage Winnipeg Corp.
To follow up on this or any other articles on the blog, contact Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director.
Thank you to everyone who submitted nominations for this year's awards! 

Heritage Winnipeg's Annual Preservation Awards are coming up next week! Here are the nominations we have received for the building awards:

Nominee #1

Heritage Winnipeg is very pleased to be recognizing…

Loftworks on James
128 James Avenue


Built in 1912, Loftworks on James was originally the De Laval Company Warehouse and has since been occupied by many businesses, including James Richardsons. The rear of the building is adjacent to Elgin Street, where people were rounded up during the General Strike of 1919. The building is now known as the Ingaldson Building, named after Winnipeg Olympic basketball player Fred Ingaldson. 

The building is presently used as an architectural engineering office, as well as housing 10 residential condos. Prior to this renovation, the building was a mostly vacant warehouse and office space. 


All exterior brick has been refurbished, cleaned, or sand blasted, as well as the interior heavy timber beams and columns, which are featured and retained in the new renovations. This purchase and renovation was a labour of love and dedication to this historical building from the start, with fantastic results.


Nominee #2

Heritage Winnipeg is very pleased to be recognizing…

District 132 Condominiums
132 James Avenue

 
The buildings that make up this complex were built from 1910-1911 and have been used as warehouse space for Burrows, Stewart and Milne Company, Richards and Brown, and Victor Fox Foods. The buildings are each three storeys tall with Tyndall stone features throughout the front elevation facing James Avenue. 


The building has been renovated to house 49 condominiums. The exterior masonry was repaired and paint removed to expose the original brick and Tyndall stone. 


Great care was taken to maintain the superstructure to ensure the longevity of the building, including maintaining the existing interior heavy timber framing where possible. This conversion has revitalized the building, while still ensuring it fit the character of the surrounding area.

Nominee #3

Heritage Winnipeg is very pleased to be recognizing…

The Bell Block
370 Donald Street

 

What is now known as the Bell Block was originally built in 1905, with the upper two floors later added in 1909. The original owners, including F.C. Bell and Bryce and Company, constructed the building as a mixture of retail and office space, owning and occupying the building until 1960. The building has stood on the outskirts of the Exchange District for 105 years, featuring metal cornice and ceiling tiles consistent with the period of construction.


 

In 2012, the building came into the ownership of the Bell Building Inc., who renovated extensively and converted the interior into 38 rental apartments and a restaurant space. While undergoing major renovation, the original wood posts and beams of the interior were conserved and left exposed along with the exterior cornice. 


The pressed tin ceiling was also salvaged, restored, and reclaimed as accents throughout the building. The extensive work put into this building has potentially added another century of life to a historical building that had been standing abandoned, vacant, and deteriorating for almost a decade.

Nominee #4
Heritage Winnipeg is very pleased to be recognizing…

Fire Hall- Station 8
325 Talbot Avenue

 
Built in 1906, shortly after Elmwood joined the City of Winnipeg, this building is the old Station 8 Fire Hall built to service the area. It was capable of housing 11 horses, 5 fire-wagons, and 16 men. At the time it was the most modern building in Elmwood, boasting steam heat, full plumbing, and electricity. 

 
The building was used as a fire hall until 1957, when it became an ambulance depot until Youth for Christ turned it into a youth centre in the 1980s. Riverwood purchased the fire hall in 2012 and immediately began renovations. Presently used as office space and multi-purpose meeting rooms, the building has undergone numerous renovations, including the repair and restoration of the brickwork, original tin ceiling, and the exposure of the old brick structure.


The front doors were also rebuilt into windows that mimic the original structure. The main floor and basement are now used as ministry space, including a 200 seat auditorium/multi-purpose community space and KidZone space in the basement.

Nominee #5

Heritage Winnipeg is pleased to be recognizing…

Neechi Commons
859 Main Street




Built in the 1920s, this building has long served as a vegetable vendor, most recently for California Fruit. Neechi Commons has taken over the building, which now serves as an aboriginal-based food, art, and social activist centre. 


The two storey brick building represents a typical North Main Street character, particularly as materials from older building were repurposed into new ones.

(sorry for the poor photo quality!)
As part of the renovations done, the brick structure of the building was stabilized along with the wooden floors, roof, and storefront glazing. Neechi Commons represents a large scale reinvestment in the North Main environment with the adaptive reuse of this building, showing a grass roots support of buildings as an element of social cohesion and heritage.

Nominee #6

Heritage Winnipeg is pleased to be recognizing…

Union Station (VIA Rail)
123 Main Street


 
Constructed in 1911, Union Station was the second train station built in Winnipeg. Recently, extensive work has been done to preserve this historic building including the rehabilitation of the rotunda with plasterwork, glazing, flooring, and the reconstruction of a kiosk in the north-east corner of the rotunda based on the original building. 


The passenger tunnel has been rehabilitated and features a heritage exhibition of historic images of the station. Numerous other renovations were also completed to make the building accessible and secure, as required by VIA Rail company standards. 

 
Union Station is a renewed, vibrant and accessible gateway to the Forks and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. The space has been transformed, with careful reinvestment in the values and purpose of this grand heritage space. For more information about the history of union station, you can check out our blog post featuring the building here.

Nominee #7

Heritage Winnipeg is pleased to be recognizing…

The Westend Commons
641 St. Matthews Avenue

 
Originally built as a church in 1913, the interior of this building was destroyed by fire in 1944. The original walls were rebuilt in 1946 and it now serves as a church, neighbourhood resource centre, and 26 low income apartments. The exterior façade has been maintained and the eves extended to protect the walls from runoff. 


The original wooden doors have also been refinished and reinstalled and many of the original interior architectural features have been incorporated in the apartments or public areas. 

 
Throughout Winnipeg’s history, this building has helped to define the character of its neighbourhood, first as a prosperous middle class suburb, then as a home for immigrants, and most recently as both a symbol and a resource in a poor, inner-city neighbourhood. The renovations have given new life to this landmark building. 


We hope to see you at the awards presentation ceremony on Monday, February 16. This is a FREE public event, with a reception and Jane's Walk Tour to follow! 
For more information about the event, click here. 


Are you familiar with any of these buildings? 
Maybe see them on your way to work or have special memories there?
Tell us about your experiences in the comments!

Like what you see? 
Don't forget to like and share this article using the links below! 

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